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Oral history interview with Leticia Shahani, 1999

Creator: Ramos-Shahani, Leticia V.
Project: United Nations intellectual history project (UNIHP).
(see all project interviews)
Phys. Desc. :Transcript: 57 pages Sound recording: 2 sound cassettes
Location: Columbia Center for Oral History
Full CLIO record >>

Biographical Note

Assistant Secretary-General for Social Development and Humanitarian Affairs

Scope and Contents

Background and childhood: born 1929, daughter of Narciso Ramos, pioneer of Philippine Foreign Service; education: Wellesley College, Columbia University, University of Paris, Ph.D.; career: United Nations [UN] Division of Human Rights, 1964-68, chair of Commission on the Status of Women, 1974, ambassador to Romania, 1975-8, assistant secretary-general for social development and humanitarian affairs, 1981-86, secretary general of the UN Congress on Crime Prevention and the Treatment of Offenders, Philippine Senate, undersecretary of foreign affairs, chair and commissioner of the National Commission on the Role of Filipino Women, ambassador to Australia; themes: women's rights, women's activism, issues involving use of term "Zionism" at Nairobi conference, significance of Nairobi conference to advancement of women's rights, UN crime prevention efforts, organization of Young Women's Christian Association [YWCA] in the Philippines, conflict arising from involvement in Philippine politics while serving in the foreign service, relationship between UN and governments, family reminiscences, colleague reminiscences

Subjects

Access Conditions

Copyright by the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies, The Graduate Center, The City University of New York, 2001

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